Podcast: Some realities about cognitive decline and ageing

The good news is that forgetting is not a sign of dementia. Joanne Earl, an associate professor and retirement researcher at Macquarie University talks about this and much more about dementia and Alzheimer’s. She looks at the real signs of dementia and where to go for resources (dementia.org.au) and hopes the future includes brain checks. […]

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Your brain needs you to have friends for retirement

People need people. That’s true in all types of situations. And the evidence is that when it comes to brain health, we do need people—social connections.

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Podcast: Research calls for a whole-of-life approach to retirement

The research says that the best retirements come from a holistic approach to life and retirement. That’s according to Joanne Earl, an associate professor and retirement researcher at Macquarie University. She suggests a ‘six-bucket’ approach that involves an emphasis on all the following: Health; Wealth; Social; Cognitive; Emotional; Motivational. Bruce Manners is the author of Retirement […]

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Making the case for lifelong learning

Keeping our brains active and engaged, stimulated and challenged is important. I was reminded of the value of lifelong learning when I recently interviewed David Bottomley. Aged 94, he’s the oldest PhD graduate in Australia’s history.

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One easy way to prepare for retirement—sleep on it

Sleep and retirement? What’s the connection? Simply this: research is demonstrating that sleep is a key to both physical and brain health.

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It’s worth attempting to keep your brain healthy now

I was reminded of the need to keep our brains as healthy as possible when I came across Bill Lyon’s story. Bill has Alzheimer’s—or ‘Al’ as he calls it. He’s personalised his disease to help him fight it—him.

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Use it and lose it for brain health

Keeping your brain active and, if overweight, losing weight, will help your brain function better. In a report on various findings, Lindsay Cook shows what some of the research is saying.

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Study finds physically fit women less likely to get dementia

Can exercise ward off dementia? A 44-year Swedish study seems to indicate that it can. ‘Researchers found that middle-age women in Sweden with a high degree of cardiovascular fitness were nearly 90% less likely to develop dementia later in life than those who had a moderate fitness level.’

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5 ways to improve your life and health span

‘Superagers’ is the term coined for those more than 80 years of age who have the cognitive capacities of adults much younger. When some of their brains were checked—after they had died—scientists think these cognitive abilities may come from the presence of certain brain cells: Von Economo.

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Yes, you can work at keeping your brain alive and active

Forgetting is a normal part of ageing. It isn’t a sign you’re developing Alzheimer’s. I remember the relief I felt when psychologist Deanna Pitchford told me that as I interviewed her for my book Retirement Ready? Harvard Health reports that there are some things you can do to keep your brain functioning better.

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